Posts filed under ‘Fishing’

Kayaking and Biking Honeoye Creek

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Launch spot: State Boat Launch with parking under 390.

A hot afternoon is perfect for a kayak & bike adventure. We wanted to be able to kayak downstream and then bike back to our car. Honeoye Creek in July is about 12″ deep in most spots and requires an occasional portage through shallow spots. This is a scenic and safe kayak ride through 3.5 miles of clear, winding water.

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This is the section we paddled. Put in at the state boat launch on Fischell Rd, and pull out under the railroad tracks, near Golah Rd.

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Chasing Kingfishers downstream

While floating along we saw Raccoons, Woodchucks, Deer, Hawk, Heron, Kingfisher, Turkey Vulture, Fox, Snapping Turtle, Painted Turtle, Rainbow Trout, Suckers, Carp, Frogs, and very few people.

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In July and August the water is shallower. Wear sneakers and enjoy cooling off.

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This greeted me when I climbed out of my kayak

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Here is the spot where you end your ride. Pull your kayak out by the bridge. This is next to Golah Rd.

Once we pulled our kayaks up to road level, we unlocked our bikes, locked the kayaks and started riding on Golah Rd to East River Rd. Head north on East River Rd until you see the entrance to the Lehigh Valley Trail. You can bike on the trail and it rejoins Fischell Rd right next t the boat launch.

It took us about two  and a half hours to very lazily kayak and about 30 minutes to ride back to our car. Pack a picnic,  bring lots of water, and remember there are no rest rooms.

July 23, 2016 at 11:42 am Leave a comment

Time-Travel Kayaking: Canadice Lake

Canadice3Three miles long and only 95 feet deep Canadice is great for kayaking as it remains calm with the steep hills that surround it and can be kayaked from end-to-end. Thanks to it being designated a water supply for the city of Rochester in 1872 and the eventual repurchasing of all private property along the lakeshore,  Canadice Lake appear as untouched as it did hundreds of years ago.

The best way to experience the beauty of this “wild” lake is from the water. A 360-degree view from the center of the lake allows you to imagine you are the first explorer to experience the calm waters and wooded shoreline, with steep hills carving the horizon. You will see no homes, no cell towers, no development of any kind.

Canadice4What you will see is Eelgrass, Water Lilies, Largemouth Bass, Smallmouth Bass, Chain Pickerel, Brown Bullhead, Pumpkinseed, Bluegill, Black Crappie, Yellow Perch, Rock Bass, Lake Trout, Brown Trout, Snapping Turtles (HUGE), Herons, Kingfishers, and maybe an Eagle. Along the edge of the lake Wild Roses and Wild Raspberries bloom.

Canadice2 Giant snapping turtles with moss growing on their shells, laze a few inches below the surface of the water allowing a close-up view of something frighteningly prehistoric.

Canadice1

Where can you launch a boat? Kayaks can be launched from several trails that go from the road to the water’s edge. Small motorized boats can be launched on the east side of the lake (see map).

For a history of Canadice.

June 26, 2016 at 2:26 pm Leave a comment

The History of Corbett’s Glen

This is usually where the salmon run out of gas.

This is usually where the salmon run out of gas.

An early snowfall with a twenty degree drop in temperature. I hear shovels and snowblowers at work. Time to layer up, grab my skis and enjoy Corbett’s Glen.

At the end of my street is a spur trail that takes me into a lovely park called Corbett’s Glen. When Mr Corbett lived here, in the fifties, he mowed a ball field for my sister and brothers to play on. Now it’s a Brighton town park with two miles of paths. The skiing here is some of the best in the county. Although the trails are not groomed like Mendon Ponds, the snow is often here for a week or two longer than any other park.

As you travel through the park you may hear three or four trains pass. Take notice as this is the famous New York Central Line. These tracks are where Abraham Lincoln’s body travelled  as it was transported from Washington DC to Springfield Ill for burial. The train passed through the glen area most likely in the night of the 26th of April of 1865,  as it left Albany April 25,  at 10pm, and arrived in Buffalo, April 27, at 7 a.m., traveling at 20 MPH. Lincoln’s funeral train was the first national commemoration of a president’s death by rail.

Railroad tracks underpass holds the creek and a road.

Railroad tracks underpass holds the creek and a road.

The north-west side of the glen has a Parking lot facing Penfield Road for easy access. The southern side can only be accessed by parking on Glen Road, off 441, and walking under the railroad trestle bridge. Two miles of Trails loop in a circle around both sections of the glen.

My Mom told me years ago that the part of the glen nearest Penfield Rd would never be developed because the Tobin Meat packing plant had used it as a dump during the war. She was convinced the ground was contaminated. My family’s first home was built on Dale Road (formerly an orchard) as soon as construction began after the war. I’ve never read this information anywhere else to verify.

The paths wind through the woods, full of Bittersweet in the fall,  and the prehistoric looking Pileated WoodPecker. There are some unusual geological features:  eskers, and moraines. (eskers are what give the park trails their dramatic pitch and slope. Rivers on the ice sheet would sometimes bore a hole and flow under the ice in a winding tunnel. When the glacier and water were gone these stream beds looked like low snaking ridges of rubble.)

Allens Creek runs through the park

Allen Creek runs through the park

Today the trails are busy all day with dog walkers, families, fishermen, photographers, runners and in the winter, snowshoers and skiers. Allen Creek winds through the southern edge of the park with lovely waterfalls. There are board walks to traverse the swampy areas, a picnic table and benches and boulders along the trails for resting.

December 20, 2013 at 3:50 am 2 comments

Turning Point Park: Walk on Water

In the heart of Northwest Rochester, as you enter the town of Charlotte, there is a magical trail that allows you to walk right OVER the Genesee River!

Tucked right off Lake Avenue,  Turning Point Park has a 3,572 ft-long boardwalk over the Genesee River, at the “Turning Basin.” The  boardwalk section of the park features a pair of nesting swans, on display each year, famous rail hopping herons, turtles, ducks, Kingfishers, and many other water-loving creatures. Bring your binoculars!

The trail is also part of the 16+ mile Genesee Riverway Trail.  Continue north, once back on land, and you will wind up in Ontario Beach Park (Home of the H2O Hero). If you bike the trail south you can pick up the Greenway Trail in Genesee  Valley Park, and go all the way to Mt Morris, and beyond.

The easiest way to reach the boardwalk is to park in the lot at 260 Boxart St, right off of Lake Avenue.

October 23, 2013 at 1:53 am Leave a comment

Braddock Bay — Kayaker’s Delight

It’s hot, really hot, where can you go to cool off when it is miserably hot?

Braddock Bay.

The Braddock Bay Fish and Wildlife Management Area is a shallow water bay-marsh complex existing in five units along the Lake Ontario shoreline ranging from two to six miles west of Rochester. 

“Braddock Bay is renowned for being an excellent bird-watching location, as raptors and other birds congregate when migrating north in Spring.”  — Wikipedia

Cool Great lakes breezes, alongside gorgeous wetlands loaded with wildlife makes for an awesome adventure on a hot summer day.

Finger Lakes Summer

Locations where you can launch your kayak along the edge of the bay

I put my kayak in furthest north and explored right out onto the lake. If you put in further downstream you can travel way back into the wetlands, full of Herons, Kingfishers, Puddle ducks, particularly mallards, blue-winged teal and wood ducks all nest in this area.

Finger Lakes Summer

Beautiful spots to kayak

Finger Lakes Summer
Shy herons

Finger Lakes Summer

Great Blues

Finger Lakes Summer

Perfect haven for wildlife

July 21, 2012 at 6:30 am Leave a comment

Conesus Cycling Circling

If you want to bike around a Finger Lake but wonder if a typical Finger Lakes 50+ mile jaunt, with glacier-cut hills that will humble you, sounds more like torture than fun, try riding around Conesus Lake.

The less than 25-mile ride offers a nice variety of road surfaces, great views of the lake, parks for stopping and some great eating spots.

Continue Reading October 29, 2011 at 6:30 am Leave a comment

Finger Lakes Kayak Commute

Living in the Finger lakes region gives us the distinct advantage of having a variety of wonderful water routes. Besides the most beautiful fresh water lakes in the world, we are bordered by Lake Ontario along the north and we have an incredible natural watershed of rivers, creeks and streams. Allen’s Creek is one of these natural beauties, full of herons, kingfishers, turtles, ducks, even pileated woodpeckers (I saw them ALL) — which originates just south of where I started, and winds north to Irondequoit Bay. It has been a “water fixture” my back yard my whole life, over several moves.

Continue Reading July 24, 2011 at 3:16 pm 2 comments

Finger Lakes Mother’s Day

Finger Lakes

Southern view of Owasco Lake

West side Skaneateles

Skaneateles from West Lake Road

Trillium Fields

Carp in the chute, Montezuma Wildlife Refuge

Sunset in Montezuma WIldlife Refuge

May 9, 2011 at 1:16 am Leave a comment

Fingerlakes Fish Story

I am not a fisherman. But I know that a lot of people come to the Finger Lakes to fish, so I asked my Uncle Harold if he would write about his experiences. He has lived on Skaneateles Lake for his entire 80 years and knows the best fishing spots on the lake (which I am SURE he will never reveal).

“My best memory has to be The ” Monster” Trout that didn’t get away.

Continue Reading March 11, 2011 at 6:30 am Leave a comment

Canadice — Nice Ice

Finger Lakes

Skiing across the surface of Canadice

 

On an unusually warm winter day my husband and I went for an explore across Canadice Lake.

This is a unique lake as it serves as water supply for Rochester and there are no cottages around the lake. The big-sky view from the top of the lake is stunning. We put on skis and headed a couple of miles down the lake. It is wonderful to be able to explore a lake that has no development anywhere on it. The shore line is beautiful. The woods surrounding are full of birds including the return of the Bald Eagle.

Canadice lake

Trail view path

This lake is especially nice as there is no road down the western side of the lake, just a trail great for hiking, biking, snowshoeing or skiing.

The only activity we saw that day on the lake were a few ice fishermen.

Finger lakes WInter

Canadice Charlie, looking north

 

Here is a little information about ice fishing on Canadice:

650-acre Canadice Lake in Ontario County offers good lake trout fishing, as well as bass. Recent stockings included 5,100 lake trout, 2,500 brown trout and 2,500 rainbow trout. Its forage base consists of alewives and smelts.

While Honeoye Lake is uncharacteristically shallow for a Finger Lake, Canadice Lake has a mean depth of 55 feet and a maximum depth of 90 feet.

There is another important distinction between the two lakes, indeed between all the other Finger Lakes. This small lake has the highest elevation, and so it often freezes first and stays frozen longest. For late-winter anglers, this can mean an extended period of good ice-fishing.

Canadice Lake offers a choice of trout, panfish, bass, and smelt as well as landlocked salmon. In all the Finger Lakes in DEC’s Region 8, black bass season remains open until March 15 so bass can be taken through the ice. For more info.

Canadice Lake map

trail goes length of west side of lake

How to get to the lake:

Directions: From Route 15A, turn east onto Purcell Hill Road. Find a dirt parking area on the north side, midway between Canadice Hollow Road and Canadice Lake Road. Additional parking is available at the beginning of the trail. N42o 44.621 – W77o 34.416

Alternative Parking: A small pull-off along Canadice Lake Road, 3.7 miles south of Purcell Hill Road on west side of road (lake side), near a blue gate. N42o 41.513 – W77o 34.144

Length: 8.1 miles round trip. 9.0 miles total (including side trails)

February 19, 2011 at 9:00 am 4 comments

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